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Seeing the Forest for the Trees

Virginia pine deserves a second look January-February 2024 by Steve Carroll, Contributing Columnist If you live in the mid-Atlantic, you’ve surely seen Virginia pine, though you may have given it just a passing...

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Bald Cypress

Bald Cypress

Bald cypress is a truly unusual tree. It’s a conifer — therefore related to pines and spruces — but it drops all its leaves each fall.

The Sourwood Tree

The Sourwood Tree

Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum), also called sorrel tree and lily-of-the-valley tree, shows off dramatic sprays of fragrant, quarter-inch white flowers in early to mid-summer.

Downy Serviceberry In Flower?

Downy Serviceberry In Flower?

Nature has so many ways to announce spring’s arrival, from the flowering of daffodils, crocuses, and other early bulbs to the unmistakable calls of wood frogs and spring peepers, to the emergence of earthworms after a warm, soaking rain.

‘The Flight Of The Bumble Bee’

‘The Flight Of The Bumble Bee’

A queen wakes up in spring after a long winter nap. After finding a place to call home, and enjoying a breakfast of flower nectar and pollen, she starts laying eggs, which will turn into bumble bees.

Grow for Year-Round Color

Grow for Year-Round Color

Mention to friends that you’ve planted an evergreen tree in your yard, and most will assume you’ve added a pine, arborvitae, or a related conifer. But there are also evergreen flowering trees, and in our region, the native American holly is one of the most popular.

Spirit of the Season

Spirit of the Season

The season of gratitude is upon us. I want to thank you readers for stopping by this column to get my musings on the garden for the last 21 years. In this, my last article, I think back fondly on how plants have helped cultivate friendships and well-being.