A publication of the Virginia, Maryland & Delaware Association of Electric Cooperatives

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Grow for Year-Round Color

Grow for Year-Round Color

Mention to friends that you’ve planted an evergreen tree in your yard, and most will assume you’ve added a pine, arborvitae, or a related conifer. But there are also evergreen flowering trees, and in our region, the native American holly is one of the most popular.

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Grow for Year-Round Color
GMOs Explained
GMOs Explained

GMOs Explained

Many consumers are curious to learn more about the purpose and safety of GMOs.

SHADY AND SHEDDING

SHADY AND SHEDDING

You could hardly find a better-named tree than shagbark hickory, though paper birch, striped maple and longleaf pine are in the running.

Black Cherry

Black Cherry

Black cherries make handsome specimen trees. White flowers hang in four- to six-inch, upright to pendulous clusters. They are visited by native bees, honeybees, flies and beetles, and, after pollination, they form purple to blue-black fruits.

Ash: A Tree on the Brink

Ash: A Tree on the Brink

A mature, open-grown white ash is a magnificent tree. It grows straight and true, with bark ridges that interlace to form elongated diamonds.

Eastern Redbud

Eastern Redbud

Few spring sights rival the impact of rounding a curve on a back-country road and coming upon a group of Eastern redbud trees in flower.

Loblolly Pine

Loblolly Pine

Across much of the southeast U.S., including in the mid-Atlantic, pines are a prominent part of our forests and woodlands. Loblolly pine is planted more often than any of its cousins.