CO-OPPRINCIPLES

Cooperative businesses adhere to seven guiding principles:

1. Voluntary and Open Membership — Cooperatives are voluntary organizations, open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, without gender, social, racial, political, or religious discrimination.

2. Democratic Member Control — Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions. The elected representatives are accountable to the membership. In primary cooperatives, members have equal voting rights (one member, one vote) and cooperatives at other levels are organized in a democratic manner.

3. Members’ Economic Participation — Members contribute equitably to, and democratically control, the capital of their cooperative. At least part of that capital is usually the common property of the cooperative. Members usually receive limited compensation, if any, on capital subscribed as a condition of membership.

Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: developing the cooperative, possibly by setting up reserves, part of which at least would be indivisible; benefiting members in proportion to their transactions with the cooperative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.

4. Autonomy and Independence — Cooperatives are autonomous, self-help organizations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organizations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their cooperative autonomy.

5. Education, Training, and Information — Cooperatives provide education and training for their members, elected representatives, managers, and employees so they can contribute effectively to the development of their cooperatives. They inform the general public, particularly young people and opinion leaders, about the nature and benefits of cooperation.

6. Cooperation Among Cooperatives — Cooperatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the cooperative movement by working together through local, national, regional, and international structures.

7. Concern for Community — While focusing on member needs, cooperatives work for the sustainable development of their communities through policies accepted by their members.

This information is from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s website.


 

 

To read Margo Oxendine's latest Rural Living column (titled "Wildlife in My Living Room"), click here: www.co-opliving.com/lifestyle/rural-living/ ... See MoreSee Less

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It's National Pasta Day!! Share a link to your favorite pasta recipe in the comments below -- or tell us about your favorite pasta dish!

"Contrary to popular belief, Marco Polo did not discover pasta in Asia and bring it to Italy. In fact, in 1279 a.d., a will drafted by Ponzio Bastone was found bequething a storage bin of macceroni when Marco Polo was still in the Far East. Early Romans used a very simple flour and water dough. Pasta is the Italian word for dough. Thomas Jefferson introduced pasta to the Americas after first tasting it in Naples, Italy. In 1789, he brought the first pasta machine, along with crates of macaroni, back to the United States. Pasta became a common North American food in the late 19th century with the surge in Italian immigration." -- Source: www.nationalpastaday.com/
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4 days ago

Cooperative Living Magazine

Doug Puffenbarger of Blue Grass, Va., one of our loyal readers, contributed this gorgeous photo from Highland County. Shenandoah Valley Electric Cooperative ... See MoreSee Less

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4201 Dominion Blvd.
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060
804-346-3344
www.vmdaec.com
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