CO-OPEDUCATION

“What’s a cooperative anyway?”  “What’s the difference between an electric co-op and an investor-owned utility?” “How can I find out more about electric co-ops?”  Why do cooperatives call their customers member-owners?  What’s a G&T co-op? What does NRECA stand for? What role does a statewide association play in relation to co-ops? “What’s a cooperative anyway?”  “What’s the difference between an electric co-op and an investor-owned utility?” “How can I find out more about electric co-ops?”  Why do cooperatives call their customers member-owners?  What’s a G&T co-op? What does NRECA stand for? What role does a statewide association play in relation to co-ops?

America’s Cooperative Electric Utilities –
The Nation’s Consumer Owned Electric Utility
Network Electric Cooperatives are:

  • private independent electric utility businesses,
  • incorporated under the laws of the states in which they operate,
  • established to provide at-cost electric service,
  • owned by the consumers they serve,
  • governed by a board of directors elected from the membership, which sets policies and procedures that are implemented by the cooperatives’ professional staff.

Distribution cooperatives deliver electricity to the consumer. Generation and transmission cooperatives (G&Ts) generate and transmit electricity to distribution co-ops. In addition to electric service, many electric co-ops are involved in community development and revitalization projects, e.g., small business development and jobs creation, improvement of water and sewer systems, and assistance in delivery of health care and educational services.

Statewide Associations

In 38 of the 46 states in which electric cooperatives operate, statewide associations provide a unified voice that speaks to the general public, regulatory bodies and state legislatures on behalf of their members. These associations are voluntarily supported, governed by representatives of the member cooperatives and offer commonly desired services. Thirty-two statewide associations publish newspapers or magazines for the co-op consumer-owners, reaching more than six million readers each month.

National Representation

The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) represents the national interests of cooperative electric utilities. NRECA provides legislative, legal and regulatory services; and programs in insurance, management and employee education, training, consulting, public relations and advertising. NRECA and its member cooperatives also support energy and environmental research and administer a program of technical advice and assistance in developing countries around the world.

Cooperative Businesses

More than 100 million people are members of 47,000 U.S. cooperatives, enabling consumers to secure a wide array of goods and services such as health care, insurance, housing, food, heating fuel, hardware, credit unions, child care and utility services.

Support Powerline Workers

 

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Through snow and ice, your electric cooperative lineworkers are there.

Craig Botetourt Electric Cooperative BARC Electric Cooperative Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative Southside Electric Cooperative Shenandoah Valley Electric Cooperative Northern Neck Electric Cooperative Central Virginia Electric Cooperative Rappahannock Electric Cooperative A&N Electric Cooperative Community Electric Cooperative Prince George Electric Cooperative NOVEC
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Melted candy is the magic for sugar cookies with colored windows! Check out this reader-submitted holiday cookie recipe! And, for more recipes, check out www.co-opliving.com/food/recipes.

MAGIC WINDOW COOKIES
Kathy Fleming of Winchester

INGREDIENTS:
¾ cup butter or margarine
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 ¼ cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
6 bags hard candy in different colors

DIRECTIONS: Mix first seven ingredients to form a stiff dough; wrap and chill for at least one hour. Separate candy by color and crush each color separately, using a mallet or food processor. Roll out chilled dough ¼” thick on floured surface, using cookie cutters that have a circle or other cut-out in the middle. Place cut out dough shapes on a cookie sheet that has been lined with parchment paper and lightly greased. Fill cut-out areas with candy until they are filled and level with dough. Bake at 350 for 7-9 minutes, or until cookies are barely golden. Cool so that candy is firm before removing from cookie sheet.
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4201 Dominion Blvd.
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060
804-346-3344
www.vmdaec.com
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